Book Club Kit: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter

The Heart is a Lonely Hunterheart-is-a-lonely-hunter
By Carson McCullers
First Published: 1940
10 copies & Reading Guide

When The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, Carson McCullers’s literary debut, was first published by Houghton Mifflin, on June 4, 1940, the twenty-three-year-old author became a literary sensation virtually overnight. The novel is considered McCullers’s finest work, an enduring masterpiece that was chosen by the Modern Library as one of the top one hundred works of fiction published in the twentieth century.
Set in a small Southern mill town in the 1930s, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter is a haunting, unforgettable story that gives voice to the rejected, the forgotten, and the mistreated. At the novel’s center is the deaf-mute John Singer, who is left alone after his friend and roommate, Antonapoulos, is sent away to an asylum. Singer moves into a boarding house and begins taking his meals at the local diner, and in this new setting he becomes the confidant of several social outcasts and misfits. Drawn to Singer’s kind eyes and attentive demeanor are Mick Kelly, a spirited young teenager with dreams greater than her economic means; Jake Blount, an itinerant social reformer with a penchant for drink and violence; Biff Brannon, the childless proprietor of the local café; and Dr. Copeland, a proud black intellectual whose unwavering ideals have left him alienated from those who love him.

Reading Guide: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt – Includes Questions for Discussion

Reviews:
The Big Read
The Washington Post

Similar reads:
Plainsong by Kent Haruf
Wise Blood by Flannery O’Connor

Enjoy The Heart is a Lonely Hunter? Share your thoughts and comments below or over at Goodreads.

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