Book Club Kit: Nothing Like it in the World

Nothing Like it in the World: The Men Who Built the Transconinental Railroad, 1863-1869Nothing Like it in the World: The Men Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad, 1863-1869
by Stephen E. Ambrose
First Published: 2000
6 Copies & Reading Guide

Nothing Like It in the World is the story of the men who built the transcontinental railroad — the investors who risked their businesses and money; the enlightened politicians who understood its importance; the engineers and surveyors who risked, and lost, their lives; and the Irish and Chinese immigrants, the defeated Confederate soldiers, and the other laborers who did the backbreaking and dangerous work on the tracks.

No Reading Guide?
While there’s not an official Reading Guide, there are several resources you can try to get ideas for questions.
Book Club Queen – Ideas for Non-fiction Book Club DQs
LitLovers – Generic Discussion Questions for Non-fiction

Reviews and Articles:
UtahRails.net – “The Sins of Stephen E. Ambrose” by The Committee For The Protection Of “What is Truth” In Railroad History
The New York Times – “Working on the Railroad” by Henry Kisor
The Washington Post – “Stephen Ambrose and the Rights of Passage” by Ken Ringle
Forbes – “Nothing Like it in the World? Hardly.” by Mark Lewis
The New Yorker - “Channelling Ike” by Richard Rayner

On the Web:
More about Stephen Ambrose РWikipedia and Academy of Achievment
CSPAN – National Press Club – Stephen Ambrose discusses Nothing Like it in the World (Video)

More about the Transcontinental Railroad:
PBS – American Experience: Transcontinental Railroad
Wikipedia – First Transcontinental Railroad
Exploring the West – Transcontinental Railroad

If you enjoyed Nothing Like it in the World, you might like:
Empire Express: Building the First Transcontinental Railroad by David Haward Bain
Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West by Stephen E. Ambrose
The Great Bridge: The Epic Story of the Building of the Brooklyn Bridge by David McCullough

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