New Statewide Research Databases!

On July 1, 2014 the Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records, in partnership with the county library districts, was pleased to announce its selection of informational databases for public libraries. This collection contains 27 sites intended to assist library patrons in a variety of areas, including homework help, online learning, hobbies, and reference. 

Below you will find links to slideshow and video tutorials on how to use this new collection of research products. 

Gale Cengage Learning Collection
Below you’ll find the Gale package of research databases listed with both their Gale Cengage Learning “On Demand Tutorial” linked, and a tutorial video from one of their official YouTube channels. Browse all the Gale Cengage Learning YouTube channels to discover more:

Academic OneFile

Biography in Context

Books & Authors

Business Insights: Essentials

Business Insights: Global

Career Transitions

Chilton Library

Gale Genealogy Connect

Gale LegalForms

Global Issues in Context

Kids InfoBits

Literature Resource Center

Opposing Viewpoints in Context

Powersearch

Powerspeak Languages

Science in Context

Student Resources in Context

Testing & Education Reference Center

U.S. History in Context

World History in Context

Other Arizona State Library Databases

Ancestry 

Britannica Library

Learning Express Library

NoveList Plus

Reference USA

PCLD will be demonstrating 3D Printing at local libraries

Magic Box Flyer for Web

“Come one, come all to see the Magic Box! Watch objects materialize before your very eyes!”

It may seem like magic, or something out of Star Trek, but materializing objects are very real with 3D printing technology!

In his 2013 State of the Union Address President Barack Obama said, “3-D printing has the potential to revolutionize the way we make almost everything”.

Indeed, 3D Printing is a fascinating technology which will impact how we manufacture everything from everyday objects, art, and even artificial limbs!

Do you want to see a MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer in action? Come see a live, free demonstration!

FREE Demonstrations*:

June 13th, 1:00pm – Arizona City Community Library

June 17th, 1:00pm – Eloy Santa Cruz Library

June 23rd, 2:00pm – Vista Grande Library

June 25th, 12:30pm (Adult Lunch & Learn) – North School Multipurpose Room 351 N. Arizona Blvd. Coolidge

June 25th, 3:00pm (Tween/Teen program) – Coolidge Public Library

June 26th, 2:00pm (Kids) – Superior Public Library

June 26th, 6:00pm (Teens/Adults) – Superior Public Library

July 8th, 3:30pm – Eloy Santa Cruz Library

July 10th, 2:00pm – Maricopa Public Library

July 15th, 3:00pm – Mammoth Public Library

*all demonstrations during Summer Reading programs unless otherwise indicated

If you’d like to learn more about Pinal County’s 3D printing programming, follow them on Facebook or Twitter. You can confirm all demonstration dates on the Pinal County Library District’s Event Calendar.

Computer & Internet Access at Your Library! [SURVEY CLOSED]

Impact Survey

We want to hear from you! From May 5th to May 30, 2014 the library will be running an online survey to understand how patrons use the library’s technology so we can provide resources and services that are valuable to the community. The Impact Survey is anonymous, available in English and Spanish, and takes 10-15 minutes to complete. The survey is confidential and does not collect any personally identifiable information.

Please support the library and help us improve our services. Go to the following website to fill out the survey or access it from one of the library’s public access computers.

Impact Survey is a project of the University of Washington Information School. For more information about the Impact Survey, inquire at the library information desk or visit http://impactsurvey.org.

 

National Library Week & Library Worker’s Day, 2014

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Today marks the second day of National Library Week, which falls between Sunday, April 13th to Saturday, April 19th this year.

National Library Week is a national observance week sponsored by the American Library Association with the intent to celebrate libraries and promote all they do for our communities. This year’s theme is “Lives Change @ Your Library“, and the Honorary Chair of National Library Week is best-selling author and intellectual freedom advocate Judy Blume.

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In order to share your love for libraries, the ALA encourages you to print their speech bubble prop (click here for download) and write down how libraries have changed your life. Share your images on Facebook, Twitter, or Flickr and tag them #LivesChange or #NLW14 to spread the word!

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Additionally, National Library Worker’s Day falls on the 15th. This day is a day to recognize the value of library staff, administrators, and Friends groups. Here at Pinal County we’re exceptionally proud the staff of the 13 affiliate libraries within our district. We encourage you to get to know the people who help make your local library great by visiting our National Library Week Facebook album.

Has a library worker within Pinal County provided you with exceptional service? If so, share your story with us on our Facebook page, or write to us at @PinalLibraries on Twitter.

 

2014 Oscar Winners at Your Local Library

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Follow the links to find Oscar winning films, works by Oscar winning actors, the books that inspired them, and even soundtracks here:

Best Picture
12 Years a Slave

Best Actor in a Leading Role
Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club)

Best Actress in a Leading Role

Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)

Best Actor in a Supporting Role
Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)

Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years a Slave)

Best Animated Feature
Frozen (Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee, Peter Del Vecho)

Best Cinematography
Gravity (Emmanuel Lubezki)

Best Costume Design
The Great Gatsby (Catherine Martin)

Best Directing
Gravity (Alfonso Cuarón)

Best Documentary Feature
20 Feet from Stardom (Morgan Neville)

Best Documentary Short
The Lady in Number 6 (Malcolm Clarke)

Best Film Editing
Gravity (Alfonso Cuarón, Mark Sanger)

 
Best Foreign Language Film
The Great Beauty (Italy)

Best Makeup and Hairstyling
Dallas Buyers Club 

Best Original Score
Gravity (Steven Price)

Best Original Song
“Let It Go” – Frozen

Best Production Design
The Great Gatsby

Best Animated Short Film
Mr. Hublot (Laurent Witz, Alexandre Espigares)

Best Live Action Short Film
Helium (Anders Walter, Kim Magnusson)

Best Sound Editing
Gravity

Best Sound Mixing
Gravity

Best Visual Effects
Gravity

Best Adapted Screenplay
12 Years a Slave (John Ridley)

Best Original Screenplay
Her (Spike Jonze)

Book Club Kits Survey March 2014

It’s that time again – we want to know what your book clubs want to read! Below you will find the descriptions of the books on our Spring Book Club Survey.

To participate in the survey, please CLICK HERE. [SURVEY IS NOW CLOSED]

Signature of All Things By Elizabeth Gilbert
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly SMALL signature of all things

In The Signature of All Things, Elizabeth Gilbert returns to fiction, inserting her inimitable voice into an enthralling story of love, adventure and discovery. Spanning much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the novel follows the fortunes of the extraordinary Whittaker family as led by the enterprising Henry Whittaker—a poor-born Englishman who makes a great fortune in the South American quinine trade, eventually becoming the richest man in Philadelphia. Born in 1800, Henry’s brilliant daughter, Alma (who inherits both her father’s money and his mind), ultimately becomes a botanist of considerable gifts herself. As Alma’s research takes her deeper into the mysteries of evolution, she falls in love with a man named Ambrose Pike who makes incomparable paintings of orchids and who draws her in the exact opposite direction—into the realm of the spiritual, the divine, and the magical. Alma is a clear-minded scientist; Ambrose a utopian artist—but what unites this unlikely couple is a desperate need to understand the workings of this world and the mechanisms behind all life.

Exquisitely researched and told at a galloping pace, The Signature of All Things soars across the globe—from London to Peru to Philadelphia to Tahiti to Amsterdam, and beyond. Along the way, the story is peopled with unforgettable characters: missionaries, abolitionists, adventurers, astronomers, sea captains, geniuses, and the quite mad. But most memorable of all, it is the story of Alma Whittaker, who—born in the Age of Enlightenment, but living well into the Industrial Revolution—bears witness to that extraordinary moment in human history when all the old assumptions about science, religion, commerce, and class were exploding into dangerous new ideas. Written in the bold, questing spirit of that singular time, Gilbert’s wise, deep, and spellbinding tale is certain to capture the hearts and minds of readers.

The Supremes at Earl’s All You Can Eat by Edward Kelsey Moore SMALL the supremes at earls all you can eat
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat diner in Plainview, Indiana is home away from home for Odette, Clarice, and Barbara Jean.  Dubbed “The Supremes” by high school pals in the tumultuous 1960s, they’ve weathered life’s storms for over four decades and counseled one another through marriage and children, happiness and the blues.
Now, however, they’re about to face their most challenging year yet. Proud, talented Clarice is struggling to keep up appearances as she deals with her husband’s humiliating infidelities; beautiful Barbara Jean is rocked by the tragic reverberations of a youthful love affair; and fearless Odette is about to embark on the most terrifying battle of her life. With wit, style and sublime talent, Edward Kelsey Moore brings together three devoted allies in a warmhearted novel that celebrates female friendship and second chances.

The Kitchen House by Kathleen GrissomSMALL the kitchen house
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

When a white servant girl violates the order of plantation society, she unleashes a tragedy that exposes the worst and best in the people she has come to call her family.
Orphaned while onboard ship from Ireland, seven-year-old Lavinia arrives on the steps of a tobacco plantation where she is to live and work with the slaves of the kitchen house. Under the care of Belle, the master’s illegitimate daughter, Lavinia becomes deeply bonded to her adopted family, though she is set apart from them by her white skin.
Eventually, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction. Lavinia finds herself perilously straddling two very different worlds. When she is forced to make a choice, loyalties are brought into question, dangerous truths are laid bare, and lives are put at risk. The Kitchen House is a tragic story of page-turning suspense, exploring the meaning of family, where love and loyalty prevail.

The Postmistress by Sarah BlakeSMALL The-Postmistress
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

In 1940, Iris James is the postmistress in coastal Franklin, Massachusetts. Iris knows more about the townspeople than she will ever say, and believes her job is to deliver secrets. Yet one day she does the unthinkable: slips a letter into her pocket, reads it, and doesn’t deliver it.
Meanwhile, Frankie Bard broadcasts from overseas with Edward R. Murrow. Her dispatches beg listeners to pay heed as the Nazis bomb London nightly. Most of the townspeople of Franklin think the war can’t touch them. But both Iris and Frankie know better…
The Postmistress is a tale of two worlds-one shattered by violence, the other willfully naïve-and of two women whose job is to deliver the news, yet who find themselves unable to do so. Through their eyes, and the eyes of everyday people caught in history’s tide, it examines how stories are told, and how the fact of war is borne even through everyday life.

Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly
Wolf_Hall_cover

WINNER OF THE 2009 MAN BOOKER PRIZE
WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FOR FICTION
A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
England in the 1520s is a heartbeat from disaster. If the king dies without a male heir, the country could be destroyed by civil war. Henry VIII wants to annul his marriage of twenty years and marry Anne Boleyn. The pope and most of Europe opposes him. Into this impasse steps Thomas Cromwell: a wholly original man, a charmer and a bully, both idealist and opportunist, astute in reading people, and implacable in his ambition. But Henry is volatile: one day tender, one day murderous. Cromwell helps him break the opposition, but what will be the price of his triumph?
In inimitable style, Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall is “a darkly brilliant re-imagining of life under Henry VIII. . . . Magnificent.” (The Boston Globe).

Woman UpstairsThe Woman Upstairs By Claire Messud
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

Nora Eldridge is a reliable, but unremarkable, friend and neighbor, always on the fringe of other people’s achievements. But the arrival of the Shahid family—dashing Skandar, a Lebanese scholar, glamorous Sirena, an Italian artist, and their son, Reza—draws her into a complex and exciting new world. Nora’s happiness pushes her beyond her boundaries, until Sirena’s careless ambition leads to a shattering betrayal. Told with urgency, intimacy, and piercing emotion, this New York Times bestselling novel is the riveting confession of a woman awakened, transformed, and abandoned by a desire for a world beyond her own.

Austerlitz By W.G. Sebald SMALL austerlitz
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

This tenth anniversary edition of W. G. Sebald’s celebrated masterpiece includes a new Introduction by acclaimed critic James Wood. Austerlitz is the story of a man’s search for the answer to his life’s central riddle. A small child when he comes to England on a Kindertransport in the summer of 1939, Jacques Austerlitz is told nothing of his real family by the Welsh Methodist minister and his wife who raise him. When he is a much older man, fleeting memories return to him, and obeying an instinct he only dimly understands, Austerlitz follows their trail back to the world he left behind a half century before. There, faced with the void at the heart of twentieth-century Europe, he struggles to rescue his heritage from oblivion.

Diary of a Country Priest By Bernanos, Georges SMALL Georges_Bernanos_Diary_Of_A_Country_Priest_sm
Reviews: Kirkus | Amazon

In this classic Catholic novel, Bernanos movingly recounts the life of a young French country priest who grows to understand his provincial parish while learning spiritual humility himself. Awarded the Grand Prix for Literature by the Academie Francaise, The Diary of a Country Priest was adapted into an acclaimed film by Robert Bresson. “A book of the utmost sensitiveness and compassion…it is a work of deep, subtle and singularly encompassing art.” — New York Times Book Review

Life After Life by Kate Atkinson SMALL life-after-life
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

What if you could live again and again, until you got it right?
On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born, the third child of a wealthy English banker and his wife. She dies before she can draw her first breath. On that same cold and snowy night, Ursula Todd is born, lets out a lusty wail, and embarks upon a life that will be, to say the least, unusual. For as she grows, she also dies, repeatedly, in any number of ways. Ursula’s world is in turmoil, facing the unspeakable evil of the two greatest wars in history. What power and force can one woman exert over the fate of civilization — if only she has the chance?
Wildly inventive, darkly comic, startlingly poignant — this is Kate Atkinson at her absolute best.

The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey by Walter Mosely SMALL last days of ptolemy grey
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

Marooned in an apartment that overflows with mementos from the past, 91-year-old Ptolemy Grey is all but forgotten by his family and the world. But when an unexpected opportunity arrives, everything changes for Ptolemy in ways as shocking and unanticipated as they are poignant and profound.

You Don’t Look Like Anyone I Know: A True Story of Family, Face Blindness, and Forgiveness by Heather Sellers
you don't look like anyone i knowReviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

Heather Sellers is face-blind-that is, she has prosopagnosia, a rare neurological condition that prevents her from reliably recognizing people’s faces. Growing up, unaware of the reason for her perpetual confusion and anxiety, she took what cues she could from speech, hairstyle, and gait. The truth was revealed two decades later when Heather took the man she would marry home to meet her parents and discovered the astonishing truth about her family and about herself. In this uplifting memoir, Sellers illuminates a deeper truth: that even in the most chaotic and heartbreaking of families, love may be seen and felt.

Whistling Past the Graveyard by Susan Crandall SMALL whistling past the graveyard
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

In the summer of 1963, nine-year-old Starla Claudelle runs away from her strict grandmother’s Mississippi home. Starla’s destination is Nashville, where her mother went to become a famous singer, abandoning Starla when she was three. Walking a lonely country road, Starla accepts a ride from Eula, a black woman traveling alone with a white baby. Now, on the road trip that will change her life forever, Starla sees for the first time life as it really is—as she reaches for a dream of how it could one day be.

Loving Frank by Nancy Horan SMALL loving frank
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

I have been standing on the side of life, watching it float by. I want to swim in the river. I want to feel the current. So writes Mamah Borthwick Cheney in her diary as she struggles to justify her clandestine love affair with Frank Lloyd Wright. Four years earlier, in 1903, Mamah and her husband, Edwin, had commissioned the renowned architect to design a new home for them. During the construction of the house, a powerful attraction developed between Mamah and Frank, and in time the lovers, each married with children, embarked on a course that would shock Chicago society and forever change their lives.
In this debut novel, fact and fiction blend together brilliantly. Drawing on years of research, Horan weaves little-known facts into a compelling narrative, vividly portraying the conflicts and struggles of a woman forced to choose between the roles of mother, wife, lover, and intellectual.
Elegantly written and remarkably rich in detail, Loving Frank is a fitting tribute to a courageous woman, a national icon, and their timeless love story.

Happier at Home: kiss more, jump more, abandon a project, read Samuel Johnson, and my other experiments in the practice of everyday life / Gretchen Rubin By Gretchen RubinSMALL happier at home
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

One Sunday afternoon, as she unloaded the dishwasher, Gretchen Rubin felt hit by a wave of homesickness. Homesick—why? She was standing right in her own kitchen. She felt homesick, she realized, with love for home itself. “Of all the elements of a happy life,” she thought, “my home is the most important.” In a flash, she decided to undertake a new happiness project, and this time, to focus on home.
And what did she want from her home? A place that calmed her, and energized her. A place that, by making her feel safe, would free her to take risks. Also, while Rubin wanted to be happier at home, she wanted to appreciate how much happiness was there already.
So, starting in September (the new January), Rubin dedicated a school year—September through May—to making her home a place of greater simplicity, comfort, and love. Each month, Rubin tackles a different theme as she experiments with concrete, manageable resolutions—and this time, she coaxes her family to try some resolutions, as well. 

The Perfume Collector By Kathleen Tessaro SMALL the perfume collector
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly

A remarkable novel about secrets, desire, memory, passion, and possibility.
Newlywed Grace Monroe doesn’t fit anyone’s expectations of a successful 1950s London socialite, least of all her own. When she receives an unexpected inheritance from a complete stranger, Madame Eva d’Orsey, Grace is drawn to uncover the identity of her mysterious benefactor.
Weaving through the decades, from 1920s New York to Monte Carlo, Paris, and London, the story Grace uncovers is that of an extraordinary woman who inspired one of Paris’s greatest perfumers. Immortalized in three evocative perfumes, Eva d’Orsey’s history will transform Grace’s life forever, forcing her to choose between the woman she is expected to be and the person she really is. The Perfume Collector explores the complex and obsessive love between muse and artist, and the tremendous power of memory and scent.

Between Shades of Gray By Ruta Sepetys SMALL between shades of gray
Reviews: Kirkus | Publisher’s Weekly
Author Q & A

A moving and haunting novel for readers of The Book Thief.
Fifteen-year-old Lina is a Lithuanian girl living an ordinary life–until Soviet officers invade her home and tear her family apart. Separated from her father and forced onto a crowded train, Lina, her mother, and her young brother make their way to a Siberian work camp, where they are forced to fight for their lives. Lina finds solace in her art, documenting these events by drawing. Risking everything, she imbeds clues in her drawings of their location and secretly passes them along, hoping her drawings will make their way to her father’s prison camp. But will strength, love, and hope be enough for Lina and her family to survive? This powerful tale of heartbreak and hope is sure to haunt readers long after they finish the last page.

Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg Lean In
Reviews: Kirkus Publisher’s Weekly

Thirty years after women became 50 percent of the college graduates in the United States, men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in government and industry. This means that women’s voices are still not heard equally in the decisions that most affect our lives. In Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg examines why women’s progress in achieving leadership roles has stalled, explains the root causes, and offers compelling, commonsense solutions that can empower women to achieve their full potential.
In Lean In, Sandberg digs deeper into these issues, combining personal anecdotes, hard data, and compelling research to cut through the layers of ambiguity and bias surrounding the lives and choices of working women. She recounts her own decisions, mistakes, and daily struggles to make the right choices for herself, her career, and her family. She provides practical advice on negotiation techniques, mentorship, and building a satisfying career, urging women to set boundaries and to abandon the myth of “having it all.”  She describes specific steps women can take to combine professional achievement with personal fulfillment and demonstrates how men can benefit by supporting women in the workplace and at home.
Sandberg is the chief operating officer of Facebook and is ranked on Fortune’s list of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Business and as one of Time’s 100 Most Influential People in the World. In 2010, she gave an electrifying TEDTalk in which she described how women unintentionally hold themselves back in their careers. Her talk, which became a phenomenon and has been viewed more than two million times, encouraged women to “sit at the table,” seek challenges, take risks, and pursue their goals with gusto.

We Recommend… The Lewis Man by Peter May

The Lewis Man: Book Two of the Lewis Trilogy
By Peter May

lewisman300

The Lewis Man is the second book in Peter May’s Lewis Trilogy.  In it, we continue to follow detective Fin Macleod and his fellow Hebridean islanders, as a young man’s body is discovered buried in the peat of Lewis Island.  When DNA shows the body to be related to Fin’s son’s maternal grandfather, Fin is determined to discover who the young man was and who murdered him.  Since the grandfather is lost in dementia, Fin has to follow a torturous path to get to the bottom of it all. May’s characters are so alive and the mystery so compelling that it becomes hard to put this book down.  The first book in the trilogy is titled The Black House, and it is worthwhile to read this one before The Lewis Man.

Review by Eileen Jaffe, Pinal County Library District Cataloger 

Book Club Kit: Great House

Great Housegreat-house-by-nicole-krauss
By Nicole Krauss
First Published: 2010
10 copies & Reading Guide

For twenty-five years, a reclusive American novelist has been writing at the desk she inherited from a young Chilean poet who disappeared at the hands of Pinochet’s secret police; one day a girl claiming to be the poet’s daughter arrives to take it away, sending the writer’s life reeling. Across the ocean, in the leafy suburbs of London, a man caring for his dying wife discovers, among her papers, a lock of hair that unravels a terrible secret. In Jerusalem, an antiques dealer slowly reassembles his father’s study, plundered by the Nazis in Budapest in 1944.

Connecting these stories is a desk of many drawers that exerts a power over those who possess it or have given it away. As the narrators of Great House make their confessions, the desk takes on more and more meaning, and comes finally to stand for all that has been taken from them, and all that binds them to what has disappeared.

Great House is a story haunted by questions: What do we pass on to our children and how do they absorb our dreams and losses? How do we respond to disappearance, destruction, and change?

Nicole Krauss has written a soaring, powerful novel about memory struggling to create a meaningful permanence in the face of inevitable loss.

Reading Guides (questions for discussion):
Lit Lovers
Oprah Magazine

Reviews:
The New York Times
The Nation

On the web:
Author Bio
Author InterviewPBS News Hour 

Similar Reads:
The End of the Land by David Grossman
A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan
Tinkers by Paul Harding
Day for Night by Frederick Reiken

Enjoy Great House? Share your thoughts and comments below or over at Goodreads.